How NOT to Serve Disabled Customers

Me at an anime/manga exhibit in a London museum 

Hey, guys! Today I’m going to be sharing some negative experiences I’ve had with customer service and advice on what could’ve been done better. Me and my mother both love to learn and discover so we have a tradition of visiting a different museum every month. Body museums, chocolate museums, train museums, prison museums… we’ve seen it all. With my friends, I like to see Marvel movies in the cinema and go to cafés to hang out. Basically, for a disabled teenager – I really get around.

Sometimes staff are very helpful when it comes to my disability; sometimes they’re a little confused by me; sometimes they’re downright rude. So here are five tips on the correct way to serve disabled customers:

1. Don’t take advantage

Me holding my colourful purse ❤

I rely on a lot of other people to handle my money since my fingers are physically incapable of holding coins. I usually just bring my colourful purse along with me and then hand it to friends, cashiers, or workers at a restaurant when they ask me to pay. I trust them to count out the correct amount of money and take it. Thankfully it rarely happens, but once or twice, the numbers haven’t added up when I’ve got back home. I want to give people the benefit of the doubt and say that the money was probably accidentally counted incorrectly.

My advice: My advice is to always count out a wheelchair-user’s money in front of them if they can’t take the money out of their purse/wallet themselves. I rely on the goodness of others when I spend money outside the house so it helps to take a little extra stress off my mind when I see cashiers showing me that they aren’t taking more of my money than necessary. The good news is: as a wheelchair-user, I do get a lot of discounts!

2. Wheelchair-accessible should mean wheelchair-accessible

If you’re a wheelchair-user, then you know that you have to check everything (and then check it again) before you can go anywhere: check whether your destination is wheelchair-accessible, what parts of it aren’t, if there are lifts or stairs, etc. When we go on holiday, we also have to take into account what the general terrain of the country is like, how the pavements/ramps look, and if they have enough wheelchair-parking spots around. Not to mention checking the itinerary for every day to see where we could visit and what I could do, since there are some things other wheelchair-users can do that I can’t, and vice versa. It’s a very meticulous and careful process.

My sister about to carry me up some stairs at the Megalithic Temples of Malta

Now imagine when certain places pass all of these checks by claiming to be wheelchair-accessible – but really aren’t. In most countries, you only need one room in the entire building to be accessible to wheelchairs to be able to claim that the whole thing is. We once went to a so-called ‘wheelchair-accessible’ castle and I could only travel up and down one empty hallway in the entire place. It’s exhausting and a waste to spend money on travel, travel far, pay for visiting the attraction, and then only be able to spend five minutes travelling up and down a long corridor.

I can’t tell you how many times this has happened – how many countless museums and buildings have misleading information in their brochures and websites about accessibility. It can truly ruin a wheelchair-user’s day. It’s also annoying when attractions (like a castle we visited in Warwick) have a lift but it’s been broken for many weeks and their website wasn’t updated to include this information

My advice: I know that you can claim to be wheelchair-accessible if only one of your rooms is, but please don’t bother. And if your lifts have been broken for a long time, please update your website to include this information and save people from potentially wasting their day travelling out to a place that they actually can’t visit.

3. Make clear if disabled people need to bring proof with them

Me at a museum in The Netherlands

One truly shocking experience I had was going to a museum in Amsterdam with my mother and father. The museum offered a discount for disabled visitors and they had to take a different path through the museum to be able to access its lifts. Me and my parents went to register as a disabled visitor at the front desk only to be told: “no, those features are only for people who are actually disabled.” I looked down at my wheelchair. What?! He refused to believe that I was disabled. He said that it wasn’t for people who had simply sprained their ankle or broken their leg for a few days. He explained afterwards that my age contributed to his disbelief: in most people’s minds, only old people can be ‘truly’ disabled and young people only end up in wheelchairs due to temporary injuries.

My father attempted to explain to him that I was simply born this way. But, even though my father was speaking in a perfectly calm voice, the desk worker was intimidated by him. Therefore, he started to panic and the discussion became more heated. It looked as if the worker was moments away from calling help and kicking us out before my father found a way to defuse the situation: the only way he could get the man to believe that I was truly disabled was by picking up my limp wrists and showing him my curled, limp fingers. After the desk worker examined them – the realisation sunk in. He was extremely apologetic afterwards and admitted that he handled the situation badly which I appreciated. I don’t think that he meant to offend us. It was just a misunderstanding. But it did feel very demeaning having to show him my hands like that, and he wasn’t properly listening to my father as he tried to explain the situation.

My advice: If you’re going to let your front desk workers guess on a case-by-case basis who is disabled and who isn’t – just say on your website that they should bring proof of disability with them and save everyone the hassle, please.

4. Know how to treat disabled people if you are a disability service worker

Me getting loaded into a wheelchair taxi. The rainbow circle is for anonymity

Some of the worst ableism I’ve encountered has been from people who work specifically with disabled people: it was the accessibility experts at the London airports who would address my mother instead of me when asking questions about me, it has been wheelchair taxi drivers who have made the offensive assumptions that I couldn’t read or that I couldn’t move my limbs on my own (so they picked up my arms without my permission and moved them for me), it was a disability nurse who refused to stop calling me ‘handicapped’ after I kindly asked her to stop addressing me with that term.

My advice: Their excuse is always: “I see so many disabled people every day and they usually do it like this or ask me to do this.” I can’t comprehend how someone who works so closely with disabled people doesn’t understand that we’re not all the same. I know it might seem tedious to have to ask every time what a disabled person’s abilities are but please do keep asking and don’t assume. No matter how many of us you see in a day.

5. Awareness about wheelchair spots on trains

Picture of wheelchairs on a train platform by Lisanto 李奕良 via Unsplash.com

Most people know how difficult it is to travel via bus and train in a wheelchair. They know how sometimes you have to travel in circles until you finally find another stop on your journey that has an exit for wheelchairs. However, even when trains do have spots for wheelchairs, it can still be an unpleasant journey. Wheelchair seats on trains in the Netherlands are usually right next to the train’s toilet or in an unpractical place on the vehicle.

On a journey to Amsterdam one day, the wheelchair seat was right in the middle of a busy hallway on the train which people were constantly walking through. There wasn’t a lot of space, so people were regularly tripping over my legs, squeezing past by pressing into me, and bashing roughly past me as they walked through. It made for a very uncomfortable, painful, and generally awful ride. I couldn’t do anything but turn my face away from the people stumbling over my legs as I cried silent tears of distress. That train ride made me feel like something I hate to feel like: an obstacle in the way.

My advice: I wish I could advise on how to change something like this – but since we’re still at the stage of having to feel thankful when a building has a wheelchair-accessible bathroom or when a train has a spot for a wheelchair in the first place – I doubt that something like this is going to change for many years to come. I truly understand why so many disabled people hate to travel (or even leave their homes sometimes).

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Me and my family posing for a picture on a fun day out

That’s it for these five tips! They may seem a little negative, but the ending to almost every one of these stories is that I ended up having a great time with my family or friends on a fantastic day out. I know that most of these customer services/service workers meant well, so I don’t hold any hostility towards them – these are simply some tips which may help them to make their disabled visitor’s lives a little easier. I don’t see people talking about these kinds of things very often so I decided to speak up about it. I hope that you enjoyed them!

I know that most people have stories like these. What is your experience of being mistreated by customer service? What could have been done to improve the situation? Feel free to comment below. Thanks so much for reading ❤ See you soon!

148 thoughts on “How NOT to Serve Disabled Customers

    1. I didn’t mention the names of any specific museums in the post because I didn’t want to seem like I was publicly outing them with the intention of throwing hate their way. I can, however, name a few that we’ve been to like Nemo and Het Scheepvaartmuseum in Amsterdam, and say that the manga/anime exhibit was at an English museum called The British Museum. I LOVED that one – it was so much fun getting to know more about the process behind making a blockbuster anime – I highly reccomend that museum. I’m happy that you found this post to be interesting, thank you! 😊

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging this! That truly means a lot to me 💕 Hopefully, it will help more people to see this and some customer service will improve how they treat disable customers. I really appreciate your support and can’t thank you enough!!! 😊

      Liked by 3 people

    1. I agree, a lot of these are actually just common sense but you’d be surprised by how many people treat having a disabled customer/visitor as some sort of alien experience rather than how simple it can actually be. Thank you for these kind words ❤ Hopefully, since I experienced these things and then shared about it here, it’ll help things to be different in the future for others 💕

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  1. Thank you for another very impressive and interesting article! I am feeling sorry, for your inconveniences. Yes, museums should be free of barriers. There are a lot of great advices by you. Thank you also for these. I hope you enjoy a beautiful weekend! Best wishes, Michael

    Liked by 2 people

    1. You’re welcome, your praise means a lot to me 😊 I agree, museums are a wonderful tool for learning and exploring new elements about the world so they should be free of barriers and not make certain visitors not feel welcome there. I’m glad you enjoyed the advice also – I shared it to add a positive swing to some of these negative situations by showing what could have been done better next time. I hope that you enjoy your weekend too!!! 💕

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you! 😊 It baffles me too. I guess that’s why I wrote this post – to expose how silly some of these things are, like claiming to be wheelchair-accessible when you’re really not. Thank you so much for visiting and commenting ❤ I truly appreciate hearing your feedback.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I hope that they will to. No one deserves to feel unwelcome when they visit a museum, cafe, restaurant, etc. Yes, I really like museums, I’m glad you enjoyed hearing about that! I always appreciate your kind and thoughtful comments, Ashok. Thank you so much ❤

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  2. I hope that this reaches more people and that the system gets better. It’s shocking and appalling that there are people who take advantage, behave rudely and claim to be accessible when they’re most certainly not. I’m sorry that you had to go through all of that. I hope that your future outings won’t be so tiresome. These are great tips to make any place more convenient for differently abled customers too. Hope you have a great weekend, Simone.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I hope that too – future disabled customers shouldn’t have to go through the same. It is shocking – I was shocked while it was happening to me. Thank you, hopefully by raising awareness about things like this – it will have an impact and these kinds of things will happen less. I’m glad that you enjoyed these tips! 😊 I hope that you will have a great weekend too, Shweta 💕

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  3. Oh my…..I’m so sorry you had to go through some of these inconveniences. It’s such a shame really to see how such people are mistreated or misjudged in everyday life, and I hope that you don’t experience any of these in the future.

    Thanks for sharing these tips with us! Have a great weekend ahead!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, it is a shame. Thank you so much for these kind words, I also hope that I won’t experience any more of these in the future. You’re welcome, I’m glad that you enjoyed them! I hope that you have a great weekend too! 💕

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  4. Simone, you and your family have my admiration for choosing to lead a full life even though you must overcome obstacles and ignorance everywhere you go. It saddens me that disabled people must still fight for their dignity and their civil rights.

    It is also amazing that some people actually try to take unfair advantage of accommodations for disabled people by pretending to be disabled. My son has a service dog. His disability is not obvious. Unfortunately, there are dog vests for sale on the internet to people who are not disabled and want to take their pets into stores, restaurants, and medical facilities. These untrained dogs give a poor impression of service animals and create additional obstacles for those who have certified, legitimate service dogs. My son struggles with these issues every day.

    In the US, there are over 150 different disabilities that qualify people to have service dogs. Employees of businesses and institutions are not qualified to judge whether a person is disabled or not. It was heartbreaking to read how your father had to allow a clerk to inspect your hands to prove you were truly disabled. Questions about what a person’s disability is are illegal here and probably are illegal elsewhere as well, but the law continues to be violated.

    Advocating for yourself and others is exhausting and should not be necessary, but I feel that you are doing the right thing to go out and live your life. Until things change, there is not a better alternative, it seems to me.

    All the best, Simone! ❤ ❤ ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I feel honoured that you feel admiration towards me and my family for continuing to be adventurous and exploratory despite the challenges that come with doing so in a wheelchair. I’m lucky enough to have family members that can carry me up stairs when there’s no lift, and refuse to back down when I’m treated unfairly. I’m so sorry that your son has to experience those struggles. I can’t believe that real people would do that, I’m honestly struggling to wrap my head around how someone could take advantage of accommodations for disabled people in that way. Some people really have very low morals and it saddens me to hear about it. I wasn’t aware that there were places in the world where asking questions about a person’s disability is illegal – but it makes sense. I should do some research and find out whether that’s the case here too in NL or in England. Advocating can sometimes be tiring but I agree and also feel as if it’s the right thing to do. Whenever I experience something like this I always approach it as ‘well now I should write this down and share about it so that hopefully NEVER has to happen again’. I wish you all the best too, thank you for this kind and wonderfully thoughtful comment ❤ I always feel like I learn so much when I hear from you.

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  5. What an informative and honest post! I read the whole thing and I really appreciate you sharing parts of your journey with us 🙏🏻🤗. As always, your bright energy shines powerfully through your words!! Keep standing up for yourself and shining your beautiful light. Much love, my dear friend 🤗🖤

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    1. Thank you! I’m glad that you read it and that you enjoyed these stories that I shared ❤ That’s such a kind thing to say! Thanks for these extremely kind and uplifting words. I promise to keep standing up for myself as well as for other disabled people who might go through the same. Much love to you too, my beautiful, amazingly talented friend 💕🤗💕

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  6. Simone,

    Once again you have provided concrete, thoughtful guidance on issues that shouldn’t persist, but regrettably continue even despite laws and what should be basic humanity.

    Your understanding and forgiveness are terrific and show the resilience that enables you to lead a rich life. Is there any publication where you might submit an essay like this so it reaches the people who most need to hear it?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, I greatly appreciate your feedback ❤ I’m glad that you found this post to be thoughtful. I agree, at this point, these issues really shouldn’t persist but unfortunately, as I’ve experienced, they often do. Thank you so much for these kind words – no matter what I face, I try to be as understanding and forgiving as possible. I think that otherwise it would be easy for someone like me to turn into a very bitter person with everything that I have to face and deal with. I just did some quick research and I unfortunately couldn’t find a publication where I could submit something like this. I have, however, been reaching out by email to more and more people in positions of power with requests for better accessibility and an opportunity to share my story with more people. Hopefully something will come of that

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  7. Hearing these experiences really broke my heart😞 How can someone even do that? I am really happy about your optimism and your dedication to make the change!
    Have a wonderful weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for the support, I really appreciate it ❤ I know, sometimes it was hard to believe that someone would do something like that to me. It means a lot that you like my optimism and my passion for making a change. If I wasn’t able to see the good side of some of these situations, they’d be even harder to deal with. I hope that you will have a wonderful weekend too! 🤗

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    1. Actually, you’re exactly correct! This list was originally twice as long but it seemed a little too lengthy so I had to split it up into seperate posts – one only about my mistreatment at the hands of staff and workers at rollercoaster parks which I’ve now saved for later on in the year. I’m glad that you enjoyed my points! 😊

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      1. Very much so. I work in health insurance and my wife is disabled, so I run into similar issues fairly often. It seems that a lot of people act without thinking.

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    1. You’re welcome! I’m so happy that you found it be an informative post. Yes, I also found some of these experiences difficult to believe. People’s ignorance about disabilities really shouldn’t shock me at this point but it still does. I’m also glad that I have a loving family. I hope that you have an incredible weekend, Joanna 😊

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    1. Thank you so much! 😊 These words truly touched me. Thank you for calling me powerful and an amazing soul! I am so glad that you think that I’m motivating as well. This comment made me very happy and made me smile. Thanks for always spreading your positivity and your light with me 💖

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      1. Awwww..! Your lovely words means a lot dear..! You are really amazing..! I’m so happy that I have made you happy and smile..! Sure will do everyday..! Woww..! Will always say positive words and I will keep shinning you my dear friend..!🤗🤗

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  8. Oh dear…. I can totally understand of what you went through! It’s painful to read how some people behave this way!
    But I am sure these things made you strong rather than feeling weary. More power to you dear beautiful young lady! ❤️❤️❤️🤗🤗🤗

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    1. Yes, it was shocking when these things happened. They were tough to deal with at the time. Thanks for the support ❤ You’re right though, overcoming these experiences made me feel tougher and encouraged me to write about them on my blog so that they wouldn’t happen to other people too. Thank you so much for these encouraging words and for calling me beautiful! I hope that you will have an amazing weekend! ❤🌻❤

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  9. # 2 and # 5 are definitely my pet peeves.
    My DIL wanted to celebrate her birthday at her favourite restaurant, which claimed on its website to be wheelchair accessible. So I contacted them, and asked if they had a wheelchair accessible loo. They hadn’t. So basically, I could eat and drink there and then crap and pee myself? Great.
    So I missed my DIL’s B-day party, as she wasn’t willing to find a different restaurant that was really wheelchair acccessible.

    And train travel… Let’s just agree that NS sucks. I don’t know how many times travel assistance failed to show up, which is esp. a problem when they aren’t there to help you off the train.
    I gave up on that. I complained to NS several times, and the only time they tried to sort of make amends, they send me a free day travel ticket – which I gave to my daughter, as I really wasn’t going to use it. Not without proper assurance that travel assistance would always be there for me at the arranged time. A guarantee they would/could not give me.

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    1. I’m not surprised that you could relate to some of these. It’s ridiculous that the restaurant would claim to be wheelchair-accessible but not have a wheelchair-accessible bathroom! It’s also a little bit of a shame that she wasn’t willing to find a different one that was, so that you could attend. Yes, I think I’ve only used travel assistance once before and the experience was awful – they were very dodgy with the timings and it wasn’t something I’d want to have to rely on. That’s why I’m lucky to have family members who can carry me and my wheelchair off of the train. Although I suppose I won’t be light enough to carry forever. I’m so sorry that they never made amends despite numerous complaints – these people just don’t understand how much things like this can impact our lives. Thanks for sharing your experiences with me here. It’s nice to know that I’m not the only one who’s been through things like this.

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  10. Thank you for sharing the realities of physical disability unknown to us who have been blessed not to have any, and are often unaware of.

    Your post heightened my awareness of better accommodating those disabled. Your positive attitude encourages me, and reminds me . . . “There but for the grace of God go I”.

    Be blessed my friend!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re welcome, I’m glad that you enjoyed this post. However, I don’t feel unlucky or not blessed because I have a disability – I’m very happy being the way that I am and I believe that God made me this way. It’s the multiple barriers that society puts up for people like me that makes my life difficult. I’m very happy that this post helped to heighten your awareness and encouraged you – what lovely feedback to hear! I hope that you will be blessed too, friend ❤

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  11. wow talk about mismanagement!!!! I can just feel the irritation and disappointment you must have felt while reading this post….. And don’t you even think about you being an obstacle for anyone… if you are to be anything then the word should be inspiration…… ❤❤❤
    I once went to a birthday party in a restaurant with no washrooms or anything 🙃 and it was not any cheap one, it was legit a well maintained one restaurant but just no bathroom….. like they just didn’t built any….. I don’t know what kind of alien customers were they expecting 😂😂😂😂

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    1. Yes, I definitely was feeling some irritation and disappointment at the time. People’s ignorance can honestly be shocking sometimes. Aw, thank you so much, Vaniheart for calling me an inspiration. I used to always worry about being an obstacle in the way to those around me so your words truly mean a lot to me ❤ That is so crazy that a restaurant wouldn’t have a washroom! What do they think goes hand-in-hand with eating?! That truly is very bizarre 😂

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  12. “the only way he could get the man to believe that I was truly disabled was by picking up my limp wrists and showing him my curled, limp fingers.”
    😧 🤬

    It’s unbelievable that anyone would be allowed to work with disabled people (especially the youngsters), regardless of their level of empathy and civility. They should pass a specific test in order to become caretakers or work in the field. And they should be held accountable for their mistakes (if one can call “mistake” refusing to stop using the word “handicapped”).

    Another eye-opening post…there’s so much in this world that needs changing 🙁.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I know, I was honestly very shocked at that woman. She seemed very unapologetic and just kept shrugging her shoulders and saying reasons why I was being overdramatic for asking her to stop calling me handicapped [an offensive term]. Honestly, I agree. Some of the wheelchair taxi drivers I’ve ridden with over the years knew all the basics and the rules about how to strap a wheelchair into the car, how to put the special seatbelt on, etc. But they’d still never interacted with a person in a wheelchair before until they actually started the job and were therefore slightly clueless – or they had worked with disabled kids for years and were past the point of caring what a person’s abilities were before they made assumptions and did the job without consulting the customer first. I agree, a lot needs to change. But I’m also hopeful that we can get there eventually. I’m glad you liked this one, it’s still always a pleasure when you drop by Roberta ❤😊❤

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    1. Thanks so much Lisa, I’m overjoyed that you enjoyed reading it! I greatly appreciate that – I tried to be as level-headed as possible while writing this to avoid sounding like I was merely complaining about these issues. I hope that you have a lovely weekend too, thank you so much for sharing your thoughts and your feedback with me! 💕

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  13. Hi Simone, it’s amazing how positive and strong you are. I can see your smile in each of your words, despite all the bad things you’re writing about.
    Be sure I’ll spread the word !
    I hope you’ll enjoy your next activities, with no need to worry about anything.
    Don’t give up, reading your post is a light in the dark.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for these extremely kind words, Andre. I feel so happy that you think that I’m positive and strong. Smiling despite everything that I’ve faced is my way of dealing with these sorts of things – it’s important I keep my chin up rather than turning bitter towards the world instead. I hope so too, once things open up again after the worst of the virus is over – I hope to get back to my monthly museum visits with my mother without anything like this holding me back. And thank you so much for helping to spread the word about my work, I truly can’t thank you enough for doing so ❤ I promise not to give up. I hope that you have a wonderful Sunday! 💕🤗💕

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  14. I’d admire your positive attitude Simone. This post poignantly enlightened this non-physically disabled man to better serve my brothers ans sisters who are . . . humbly reminding me “There but for the grace of God go I”.
    Be blessed my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, I feel honoured that you admire my positive attitude. I’m also glad that this post helped to enlighten you when it comes to the treatment of people with disabilities. I hope that you will be blessed too, friend 😊

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  15. It is good to put a reminder out there to be courteous to travelers and when traveling. Yes, these are common sense tips and one would think that it is unnecessary to point out that we should all be using our manners when we are relating to anyone. Somehow, as I age (and I’m no spring chicken anymore), I notice that the world has become so selfish…we don’t seem to care all that much about our neighbors like we used to.

    I related quite well to the counting out the money tip. I do this for a deaf-mute wheelchair bound gentleman customer. I can only imagine what some of his challenges must be! Nevertheless, he always comes in with a smile! 🙂

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    1. I agree, that’s why I thought that it was so important to put out this reminder. These are common sense tips yet still some people don’t follow them and don’t treat me as they should. I’m glad that you could relate to the counting out the money tip – it’s good that you do that for that deaf-mute wheelchair-user customer, that’s definitely the right way to do it. Thank you for sharing your own experience with these issues here, I greatly appreciate it 💕

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  16. Thanks for a great article and giving us a taste of what life is like for you. You are very kind to assume people mean well and to want to help others be more considerate. I hope some of them read this and take a good hard look at what they can do better next time.

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    1. You’re most welcome, I’m glad that you enjoyed reading it and experiencing the world through my eyes when I visit attractions 😊 Thank you, I usually try to see things from the other person’s perspective and to not instantly assume that they mean to do me harm. I hope that they read this too and use it to help them better themselves. I also hope that you have a lovely weekend! ❤💮❤

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  17. Such a well written post! I am so sorry you had to go through these things, I would have thought some of these things are kinda obvious! I guess not to some people 😭. I hope these tips will reach a bigger audience so people can learn from your experiences. I liked the photos of you you’ve put in this post, too!

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    1. I’m so happy that you thought that this post was well-written 😊 Thank you for the support ❤ I know, right? I agree that some of these things should be obvious but people still sometimes act like they aren’t. I hope that people will be able to learn from my experiences too, hopefully it’ll stop things like this from happening again in the future. I’m also glad that you liked the pictures that I put in this post! I had to do some digging through my mother’s old files to find some of them since, due to everything that’s been going on recently, we haven’t been able to visit a museum in a while.

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  18. Is there a website where wheelchair users recommendations or warnings are shared?
    Is there a grading system like stars??
    That would be a great resource ,of course there would need to be a way to show level of assistance needed.
    I remember hearing of a city tour where there were no spaces to get a wheelchair back on the pavement, no lower parts or ramps. Fortunately 4 strong men lifted chair and user up!

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    1. I couldn’t find anything online but individual wheelchair-accessible reviews for certain places. Maybe we should start looking through those too when we go to places. I hadn’t thought about that before. It’s a shame about that city tour – thank goodness those four strong men were able to help!

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  19. Simone what a nice way to convey something so important, I feel like its not only applicable for customer service in general but people across can do a lot with these tips, I am definitely going to keep them in mind. Thank you so much for sharing ❤

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    1. Thank you, I’m so happy that you thought that this was an important thing to convey. I agree, you don’t have to be in customer service for these tips to be able to apply to you. I’m happy that you’re going to keep them in mind, that means a lot ❤ You’re welcome, I hope that you have a lovely weekend! 💕🤗💕

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  20. I’m so glad you shared this Simone! I was completely unaware of all of so many of the challenges created by people who don’t understand disability and the varied needs of a disabled person. It’s shocking that people who work most closely with disabled people are most insensitive in their engagements…but on the other hand I can see why they end up generalising, not that I agree with it ofcourse. Again, this post is incredibly useful, both for those who have experienced similar situations (to feel that comfort in relatability) and for those who like me were quite ignorant about it and are going to check themselves for the future! Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re welcome, I’m glad that you were able to learn something new about some of the challenges that people like me have to face. It is shocking that people who work so closely with disabled people treat us that way, but I agree, I can also understand why they generalise. Thank you so much for saying that you thought that this post was incredibly useful, that truly means a lot to me. Exactly, I wrote this both so that other people could relate and for people to be educated if they didn’t know much about these things. Thank you for visiting and sharing your thoughts with me, I hope that you will have an amazing week, Gannu 🌻🤗🌻

      Liked by 1 person

  21. I think there’s one common factor that links all these problems together.
    The lack of basic understanding and compassion.
    This explains so much about the thoughtlessness and inability to deal in a gentle but efficient manner.
    Having to explain your disability is downright rude and unnecessary. And the arguing is just a projection of ego and one track minds.
    I’m not sure if training is just enough to equip individuals with a good grasp of the matter. There’s more to it which includes a person’s basic nature and kindness level.
    Everyone deserves respect and a chance to be heard.
    Sorry to hear about the uncomfortable train journey. What were the officials thinking when they allocated such special seating?
    They probably weren’t thinking at all.
    I appreciate how you’ve taken so much effort and time to write these issues down. I sincerely hope that there’s some future rectification.
    Keep on shining and inspiring. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, sometimes I think that basic training isn’t enough to prepare people for jobs like these. Some of the wheelchair taxi drivers that I’ve ridden with have known all of the correct ways to strap a wheelchair into the van, how to put the special seatbelt on, how to lock the chair in, etc. But they’d still never actually interacted with a disabled person before and therefore were clueless with how to handle the actual social aspect of the job. I agree, no one should have to explain their disability in this way – it felt very demeaning. I recently found out through someone commenting on this post that it’s actually illegal in the U.S. to demand an explanation of someone’s disability. I know, it really doesn’t make much sense to design a specialised seat on a train in that way. The officials who designed it clearly weren’t thinking very clearly about it. You’re welcome, it’s my pleasure to write things like this down and educate others about issues like these. I hope that things get better in the future too – maybe just maybe posts like these will help. Thank you so much for those kind words 💕 [By the way, I’m half-way through with my current book and your kindle book is up next on my list! I’m so excited to read it! 😊]

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Firstly, I absolutely love your purse! It’s so colourful and completely suits your personality – bold and unpredictable (but in a good way!).

    For me, the worst thing comes in my amaxophobia, people just don’t understand it, so it really impacts my ability (and willingness) to get around. They don’t understand how I can be chatting fine one minute, and then they pull onto the motorway and I’m begging and screaming for them to stop, or even just driving down a hill can make me scream and swear. It’s distressing for them, and it’s distressing and embarrassing for me, too. I have absolutely no control over it, it just happens. I’m sure it’s a side effect of stress and my need for control has well, I can’t just relax when people tell me to.

    This sounds naughty, but I always carry a benefits letter on me when I go to attractions, and I even very naughtily used to take one on dates so that I could get us two-for-one entry to attractions. I once got entry to the science museum, then we bumped into the guy’s mate who worked at the aquarium and was having a cheeky cigarette at the fire door. He let us in through the fire door so we got to see the fish for free, too. We didn’t work out but it was still fun in other ways.

    The biggest annoyance for me, is that my mother wants me to get my Blue Badge that entitles her to stuff like free parking, and closer parking. I’m not sure if you had one when you lived in the UK (it might have been the orange badge scheme back then) but they give disabled people free parking, usually up to four hours. My parents used to and have always taken me to places that I didn’t really want to go, but that meant they could benefit from my badge for so long as I had been in the car at the time, often without any benefit for me (sweets, days out etc) in return . As a kid, it was kind of annoying but as a 32-year-old married woman, it’s incredibly frustrating. Who is running my home while I’m out, granting Mum access to free parking? Who is cooking dinner while I’m still on the road? Who is exercising the dog while I’m still trying to entertain myself, browsing at things that I don’t need? No, sorry Mum, but you’re going to have to park up and pay like everyone else. It also feels incredibly discriminatory and hurtful to use me for free parking, because of my disabilities. Yes, I’d probably still qualify, but that’s not the point.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for complimenting my purse! I really love it too – colours are one of my favourite things which is why I made my blog logo rainbow-coloured. Also, thanks for sharing some of your tough personal experiences with me here. I can understand why having to deal with your amaxophobia is tough when around other people. It sounds as if it’s probably easiest to deal with when you’re around slightly more understanding people who know how much distress your amaxophobia can cause you and don’t mind being there for you or having to change routes when it starts to affect you. I hope that you have many such people in your life. I’m sorry that it makes you feel embarrassed, but I also completely understand – I just wish that things like this in the world were different.

      You shouldn’t feel naughty for using your benefits letter – you’re disabled and getting discounts and skipping queues are one of the few perks that comes with it. I used to feel naughty when I skipped the queues at rollercoaster parks until I realised that other children have been having a headstart on me my entire life, I deserve to at least be able to have a headstart at the queue for the ferris wheel at Disneyland.

      I have the Dutch equivalent to a Blue Badge, yes. I agree, people shouldn’t be using you for your disability and I’m sorry that you had to experience that. Some of my so-called ‘friends’ at school would only want me around when they were allowed to skip gym lessons with me or ride in the lift with me, but they were always gone when I needed someone to just talk to and spend time with.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re very welcome. I actually like monochrome, but with a pop of colour to break it all up. I went with black and white with my logo because they blend into my site, but if I’m honest, I’m not entirely happy with it. I think it’s okay, but it could definitely be better.

        This is true. When I have to go to court to prove that I’m disabled and have to be poked and prodded by random doctors, I suppose getting in somewhere for free is the least that I should ask for. Isn’t it amazing though how our conscience makes us feel as though we’re taking advantage, even when we’re the ones who have otherwise received a disservice?

        Ooh you’ve reminded me of something that I used to have at school, too. It was like a mini club, and the idea was that these people would include me at breaktime and lunchtime if they got to join me to do some cookery or arts and crafts instead of PE, it seems like a fair trade, right? The idea got cancelled after just three sessions and I think you can probably work out why.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi! I’m so happy to hear that you love my blog! 😊 No, personally I don’t use a hoyer lift because I’m still able to move from chairs onto the floor and then back up again using my arms. Since your husband is paralyzed, I’m sure that you were probably able to relate to a lot of the things that I mentioned in this post. Are you still looking for places for you and your husband to go? I can give you some suggestions if you need any.

      Like

      1. I reccomend researching what activities near you are wheelchair-accessible. A wheelchair-user can really go anywhere as long as the place that they are visiting is accomodating enough. Some swimming pools offer underwater wheelchairs for visitors who need them and people who can help carry people into the pool, most museums have lifts, cinemas usually have seats for wheelchair-users, etc. All it takes is a little research to see which places have things like this. I hope this helped! Never hesitate to reach out and ask me anything 😊

        Liked by 1 person

  23. What a wonderful and important post Simone! You point out so many really good tips and I hope many take them to heart.. Like trusting someone to take out the exact money needed from your colorful purse…So many small details, many might not even be aware of. I also love thaat you get out a lot, visit musesms, go to movies..this wonderful and will broaden your horizons as you grow. Your blog is both informative and inspiring..Thank you for sharing with us all .🙏❤️🤗🌹

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for these kind words, Karima! They truly mean a lot. I’m so happy that you found this post to be wonderful and important. I hope that people will take them to heart too. Yes, that’s one of the reasons I love visiting museums so much – because I always learn something new and learn more about the world. You’re welcome, I hope that you’ll have an amazing week 💕😊💕

      Like

  24. I very much much is the creativity I too from to create those interesting categories on the home page of your blog. Some forms of disability are not easily detected. Yours obviously would not be the case.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, I really enjoyed creating those categories 😊 True, not all forms of disability are easy to detect but mine is. In some countries, like the U.S., it’s actually illegal to demand an explanation of someone’s disability. It should be made clear if disabled visitors need to bring proof of disability with them or they can’t judge for themselves whether it’s true or not. Thank you so much for visiting and commenting! I hope that you will have an incredible week! 💕

      Like

  25. Your post opens my eyes to how insensitive and dishonest people can be at times. Over all I am glad that you enjoyed your trips. I share your post on Facebook. Have a blessed day.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad that this post helped you to open your eyes to things like this. I agree, sometimes people can be very insensitive and dishonest. I’m happy that I enjoyed my trips overall too, it would take something more than these experiences to ruin my day 😊 Thank you so much for sharing this post on Facebook! Your support truly means so much, thank you for helping me to spread my message. I hope that you will have a blessed day too ❤

      Like

  26. Great post and lots of good suggestions. I hope changes will come to make things easier for you to travel. I had a friend who was born with arthrogryposis. For those who don’t know what that is, the joints are fused so there is little or no mobility. His neck was fine, but all of his other joints were permanently bent. He had to go into hospital for something one time (nothing to do with that condition) and after he went home, they sent a nurse to check on him. The family read the report that the nurse filled out as to the purpose of the homecare: to get him walking again! He never walked in his life, so how she figured they were going to accomplish that I have no idea. It certainly would have taken a miracle. It amazes me how people simply don’t seem to think in these situations.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, I’m glad that you enjoyed my suggestions. I hope that new changes will come soon too. That is so bizarre that that nurse tried to visit to help get him walking again! What was the hospital thinking?! You’re definitely right – sometimes people simply don’t seem to be thinking in these situations. Thanks for sharing your friend’s experience with me here. Have a lovely day! 💕

      Liked by 1 person

  27. Your posts are always very educational. Thank you so much for a great post, once again. You show so much maturity in patience with so many of us, especially in those teachings that should be common sense. Take care and stay safe 💕🌸

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, I really appreciate that – thanks for the feedback. I’m happy that you found this post to be mature and patient – I certainly didn’t want to sound too critical of anyone here. I hope that you’ll take care and stay safe too – have an amazing weekend! ❤🌼❤

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, I’m glad that you thought this was an important post to share. The reaction from many people was that they learnt something new so I’m glad that I did. I’m also happy that you liked the pictures ❤ I hope that you’ll have a lovely day 😊🌼🌻🌷😊

      Liked by 1 person

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