I Used to be Ashamed of my Disability. Not Anymore.

Me this morning, feeling good XD

Hey, guys! I’ve been feeling especially proud this week and determined – determined to speak up and make a difference. I recently watched the disability history documentary called Crip Camp (of which my review is coming soon!) and it reminded me of how much beauty and pride there is to be found in being disabled. I used to be ashamed of my disability, which isn’t surprising – it’s almost an inevitable feeling if you grow up alongside modern media and don’t encounter many other disabled people in your life. There are so many things society says that we should be ashamed of, including simply being who we are.

Here is a list of five things I used to be ashamed of due to my disability and how I’ve learnt to be proud of them and own them instead:  

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1. Having a Stairlift

When I finally had a stairlift installed in my home last year and shared the news with the people I know, I was surprised by how many disabled people were horrified by the idea. The media definitely portrays having a stairlift as something that you should be ashamed of. It’s often shown as being synonymous with frailty and weakness. That’s why I felt like receiving a stairlift was like giving up – and a lot of other disabled people share this view.  

Me in my stairlift having fun 🙂

I believe that we should start showing having a stairlift a little more positively. When was the last time you saw a teenager or a young adult using a stairlift in films or TV? We need more casual representation where disabled people have stairlifts and it’s not a big deal or the butt of a joke. My father teasingly said the other day that when I come down the stairs in my stairlift, it’s like I’m descending into my own Batcave or getting ready to take off in one of the Thunderbird vehicles. I like that idea – stairlifts can be cool! And they’re nothing to be ashamed of.

Now I can make my way upstairs without tiring myself out. It actually gives me much more freedom and makes me feel happier during the day. Accepting extra help doesn’t have to mean that you’re giving up – it can simply mean that you’ve picked your battles a little more wisely. I now have more strength for other things and I know that stairs certainly aren’t worth more of my time or effort. I suggest decorating your stairlift to make it more your own: my stairlift is dark purple, the same colour I chose for the walls of my bedroom to be painted. Own it! Be proud!

2. Having Accidents

Time for some brutal honesty: it can sometimes be harder for me than it is for other people to make it to the toilet in time. When I was fourteen, my teacher put on a Dutch film called Bluebird for the class. The main character of the movie happened to have a younger brother who was disabled. During one of the scenes, her younger brother wakes her up in the night because he wet himself and he needs her help to get clean. Even though it was an entirely serious scene, almost everyone in my class burst out laughing at the fact that the disabled boy had wet himself.

Photo of teenagers watching a film by Pavel Danilyuk via Pexels.com

I’ll never forget how horrible I felt in that moment – I had done exactly the same just a few days ago and it felt like they were laughing at me too. I wanted to sink away and not be there in that classroom anymore. I did everything I could to hold back my tears because I was worried people would see me crying and make the connection that I also sometimes did the same. (Luckily, some of the nicer students told the others off for laughing). It made me feel like a freak and cemented in my mind that I was not normal. I resolved to never let anyone know that sometimes I had accidents because, if I did, they’d probably react in the same way and burst out laughing at me.

One of the people who spoke for the documentary Crip Camp said: “I guess you could imagine what it was like being fifteen and trying to hide the fact that you had to wear a diaper.” And I was just like – SAMSIES. It felt good to know that someone else had experienced the same. I used to do everything within my power to hide the fact that I was wearing a nappy/diaper from everyone because I was ashamed. Media once again pairs wearing nappies with helplessness and ridicule. But over time, it’s another part of my life that I’ve grown to accept. I’m now even at the stage when I can joke about it. For all you fellow nappy/diaper-wearers out there: you may not feel comfortable about it right now, but just know that it’s perfectly normal for numerous different medical reasons to wear one. Hopefully seeing me own up about it will show you that you have nothing to be ashamed about ❤ Society needs to be ashamed for saying that it’s wrong.

3. Eating in Public

Me at the Happiness Café with a vegan burger. Burgers are my FAVOURITE.

I unfortunately still struggle a lot with this one. I usually have to be fed at restaurants. It can get messy and people’s eyes are frequently glued to me which makes me feel uncomfortable – like it’s feeding time at the zoo or something. My mother and I recently went to a restaurant together and the experience was a little unnerving. It was not the celebratory treat that I had imagined it being. The food was incredible; however, I couldn’t help but regularly shield my face from people and wipe my mouth after every morsel (even though most of the time there was nothing there). Now that the lockdown is ending, I need to get used to the staring and pointing again. I didn’t realise it was something that I could fall out of practise with.

I just feel like the image of me being fed a vegan burger by my mother at the Happiness Café while sauce drips sloppily down the side of my chin, doesn’t line up with the image of the intelligent and creative girl that I truly am. I’m working on trying to take Billie Eilish’s advice by not allowing myself to feel like other people’s perception of me is my responsibility. I need to put my own enjoyment and freedom to be myself first. Thanks, Billie, for the great advice 😊

4. Asking for Help

Asking for help used to be my biggest struggle. I didn’t want to inconvenience anyone or be a burden to my friends by asking for their help. I also used to be ashamed that I required a helper to assist me by pressing the buttons on my calculator during my maths exams, I needed a nurse at lunch break, a wheelchair taxi driver had to take me home from school, etc. Every extra task I needed help with was another thing that made me less like my friends – less like everyone else. I’d sometimes struggle for up to twenty minutes to complete a task as small as picking up something from the ground that I’d dropped rather than ask someone for help with it.

Picture of an adult helping a child to walk by Alexandr Podvalny via Pexels.com

I view asking for help differently now. While watching Crip Camp, I noticed that all of the disabled campers would help each other out in whatever way they needed without any fuss. People would carry wheelchair-users into the pool, help people to walk or eat, etc. It seemed natural – someone needed help, so someone would go and help them. It made me realise that helping each other out is kind of a given in the disabled community: we’re accessible, we’re welcoming, and we’re always ready to lend a hand without fail since society has not always been willing to do the same for us. Helping each other out is something that brings us closer together and something that we should be proud of – not ashamed of.

I’ll let one of the characters from my comic book explain: “I used to think that being a disabled girl that was completely independent was the only way to show other people that I was just like them. Sometimes I needed extra help during my day-to-day, and I’d hate myself for it. But I soon realised that wasn’t right. Receiving help doesn’t make me weak or lesser than others. I’m not like them, I can’t be independent in the same way and that’s okay. I shouldn’t have to live like the able-bodied to be accepted by them. Doing things differently is our whole deal, right? We do it together, not alone.” (Willow, Obsidia 4 [still a work in progress!])

Photo of someone helping a blind person by Eren Li via Pexels.com

One of the people that they interviewed for Crip Camp said: “If you’re disabled and you happen to have a passive nature about you, you’re really screwed.” I know from personal experience that he’s right. I’m still trying to work on letting my voice be heard and fighting for what I want more. If you have a disability, no one hands you anything on a silver platter: if you want friends, you have to go up and speak to people because they probably won’t come to you. And if you want help – you need to ask. And never feel bad for doing so.

5. Being in a Wheelchair

Me with red, purple, white, and blue hair

When I was younger, I had the bad habit of sitting on my fingers so that people wouldn’t see them. My wrists and fingers are… well… different. My fingers are curled and my wrists flop down since they have no movement in them. When people stare at you constantly whenever you leave the house, it can be easy to feel like hiding or wanting to shrink away from the world. I admittedly still struggle with stares, but I’m trying to work more on being myself in public and not caring what other people think.

It starts out simple: it can feel like dressing so that you draw the least amount of attention to yourself is the easiest option. So, I’ve done crazy things with my hair like styled it in different colours or I’ve worn outfits that stood out like being the only girl in a suit when we had to dress formally for school. This is who I am and that’s never going to change. I should own it and be proud no matter how much people whisper or point when I pass by. (Keep in mind that you don’t have to dress crazy to be a proud disabled person. Do whatever you feel comfortable with!)

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As much as media and governments treat catering for disabled people or choosing to represent them as an inconvenience, I won’t let that be a reason for me to be ashamed of who I am. I’m proud to be disabled. Proud to be different. And now that I’ve found this pride, it’s going to take a lot to shake it. Thank you so much for reading this post ❤ What is something that you need to work on so that you can be more proud of yourself or the way that you look? Feel free to comment below! See you next week!

163 thoughts on “I Used to be Ashamed of my Disability. Not Anymore.

    1. I’m glad that it had an impact for you 🙂 Exactly, I used to see my disability merely as something that happened to me – not as something that is a part of who I am. Now that I’ve accepted that, I’ve finally learnt to be proud of it instead. Thank you so much for the comment ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Same here. It’s certainly a work in progress: some days it’s easy – some days it’s much harder. But just know that you are beautiful and hard-working and you definitely deserve that self-love (by the way, I love your curly hair!) You’re welcome, I’m happy that you appreciated my honesty ❤

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Awww, thank you so much, you’re very kind. When I was reading your post, I was thinking what a beautiful person you seem and that you have a lovely friendly smile. I should have written that in my first comment, but I over-thought it (typical me) and decided maybe I shouldn’t 😅💚

        Liked by 3 people

      2. No worries, thank you so much for complimenting my smile and calling me beautiful 🙂 I used to be too shy to share my face on my blog and used to only use cartoon characters so it feels truly great to hear words like these ❤

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  1. What a great post!! Yes, I think it would be great to show a stairlift in a more positive light. I have only ever seen it as being the butt of a joke in TV shows. I love that yours is purple like the walls in your room and that it makes so that you have more energy leftover for other things. I hate how a lot of the people in your class laughed at the disabled boy having an accident. Agreed, society needs to feel ashamed for saying it is wrong to wear a nappy/diaper.

    The vegan burger on the photo looks delicious. I’m sorry you struggle with eating in public and how people (rudely!) stare. That is great advice by Billie Eilish! I love how the disabled community helps each other. I find asking for help difficult too, especially from people who don’t know me well. I haven’t seen Crip Camp but it sounds amazing how everyone helps each other there. Most able-bodied people probably don’t often think about such things.

    I hate that people stare at your hands and wrists. People stared at my scarred face in high school and I dressed to draw the least amount of attention to myself back then (I got bullied anyway though). Your hair looks amazing in all of those pictures. I love seeing your smile. Yes, you should dress how you want to and what makes you feel good and proud of yourself.

    What I need to work on, when I’m with my close family I am okay doing my tics and my stimming, most of them know about it, but in public or with people who don’t know me as well or with people who don’t see me regularly in ‘real life’ / physically, I am embarrassed and I try to hide it or do it so people don’t see it as much. In my videos on YouTube I edit out the bits where I do my tics and/or stim most of the time. I also feel it is something private, but it is a part of me. Yesterday though I was in the outside air in public for a while (of course keeping distance and wearing a mask), and I allowed myself to do my tics and stims somewhat, rather than hiding them, to relieve the tension I was feeling and help make me feel a bit less overloaded sensory-wise. It was what I felt I needed to do, rather than putting lots of energy in trying to hide it. Great post!! I loved the quote from your comic book too. I wish you a great weekend!

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    1. I understand, asking for help can be tough no matter who you are. We’re trained from a very young age to want to be independant in the future. I’m so sorry that people used to stare at you and bully you at school. People can be so cruel and awful. I hope that you’ve been treated better by those around you now that you’ve transitioned into an adult. Adults tend to generally be more understanding than teenagers. I was lucky enough to never have been bullied directly – people would just ignore me or stare. Thank you so much for complimenting my smile and my hair 🙂 I used to love to get it styled but, since the lockdown, I haven’t been able to get my hair done. I’ve been experimenting with headwraps though and now I really like them too. I’m so happy that you had that experience while being outside – it can feel so relieving to not have to put extra effort into hiding who you are. I completely understand your feelings, but I also hope that overtime you will feel more comfortable in general about showing your tics in public. It’s easier said than done – I know. But you really are beautiful. Know that. And don’t let other people’s actions ever let you forget. ❤ I'm glad that you enjoyed this post and I hope that you enjoy your weekend too!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. You are such an amazing and beautiful young lady my dear. And I love you so much. And am so proud of you.

    More power to you. More love and blessings to you 💖🤗💖

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Ashok, I truly can’t thank you enough for all of the love and support that you always share with me. I worked really hard on this post so I’m honoured that it made you proud. ❤ Thank you so much for the love and the blessings. I hope that you and your family will have an incredible weekend. Send them my love. xxx

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  3. As a kid I grew up in a mostly white neighborhood, and went to a school with very few colored children. It was really tough being the odd one out. I experienced a lot of bullying and racism. It made me anxious but never stopped me from being who I am.
    I was self-conscious and ignored whatever I could.
    Point no. 4 definitely applies to me. I found it difficult asking for help. Even now, I’d rather take care of things myself. It’s like a wall around me, and I’m fine handling my problems on my own. Mostly I can, sometimes I can’t. Maybe it’s just a habit of being independent. But at times, it’s really lonely.
    All your points and realizations are liberating. I’m glad you’ve wrestled with your inner demons. It’ll make you a more accepting and resilient individual. Keep writing and inspiring! 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thank you so much for sharing your experiences, Terveen. That sounds like a very tough childhood to have to face. I’m sorry that you experienced bullies and racism, sometimes people can be so close-minded and horrible. I’m glad that it never stopped you from being who you are, because who you are is an incredibly intelligent, talented, and creative writer. I’m so happy that you didn’t let your experiences with racism hold you back from expressing that creativity and writing. The world is that little bit better for it. I can understand your struggles with asking for help, it’s perfectly natural to feel that way. But just know that there is nothing wrong with asking for a helping hand here and there. It might even bring you closer to people so that you won’t feel as lonely anymore. Humans are flawed creatures, it’s natural. But we are much stronger hand-in-hand. I truly appreciate your compliments and I’m happy that you found this post liberating. I’ll definitely keep writing and inspiring, the response so far has been incredible. I can’t thank you enough for the support ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you so much for sharing your experiences. The ups and downs of life. And yes, ‘asking for help’ shouldn’t be considered a weakness, we all are in this together, smaller pieces of a bigger picture. It’s always so heartening to read your posts and comments. They are crafted with great care and consideration.
        🙂❤️

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  4. I love your brutal honesty! So refreshing and so needed! I think compassion comes from experience, and young classmates have had little of that (same with quite a few adults for that matter). Selfishness does appear to rule in all walks of life. Unfortunately.

    There is the other side of the coin, too. Accepting (not accepting) help is sometimes a matter of pride. The wonderful helps of diapers, canes and stairlifts do make us feel weak and somehow less of a person. Simply asking for help seems to admit weakness, and weakness is, apparently, something to be ashamed of.

    I believe God made us unique for a reason. I believe we were made to help one another; to give and to receive with compassion and love. Unfortunately, many choose to live otherwise.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. I believe the same. We were all made to be unique and different, but modern society acts like ‘following trends’ and being the same is the way to go. Causing those who are different to feel as if they have to hide. It’s a shame. I wish that more people shared your view and believed in this kind of self-love and acceptance. You’re right, I also understand how pride can make accepting help difficult. I wish that people valued weakness as much as strength. Humans are naturally flawed, and sometimes you can learn more from losing than winning. I’ve learnt overtime that the people that society view as the ‘weakest’ tend to actually be the strongest when it comes to their resolve and their attitudes towards life. Flaws should be celebrated, just like talents and strengths. I once again agree with you there. Compassion definitely comes from experience – my view on life was quite bitter when I was younger, but as my classmates have grown up alongside me, we’ve all matured and become more accepting of each other. I don’t think that the same experience would’ve occured nowadays. I’m glad that you found my honesty refreshing! Thank you so much for reading and sharing your very truthful and hopeful thoughts. 🙂

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  5. What an inspiration to others as well as being a reminder to those who are not in wheelchairs or disabled. We all need to be more compassionate towards others and yet it seems the world has turned to a me-me-me society. Your blog is an in your face reminder that there are more in this world than “just me.” Thank you for being bold and strong.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I’m happy that you found this to be inspiring. 🙂 True, compassion is something that the world needs a lot more of. In the midst of our me-me-me society, people who are going through difficult situations or people who are simply different for one reason or another are often left behind and ignored. You’re welcome, I’m always happy to be a reminder to people that this is not a good way of thinking. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you! 🙂 I’m so happy that you enjoy reading my posts and that you find them to be inspiring. I love reading your poetry too, you clearly write from the soul ❤ I hope that you are staying safe and having a lovely weekend too. xxx

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Me too, it feels really good to finally be proud of these things 🙂 I agree, I really wish that the media wouldn’t stereotype these things because it affects the way that some people and disabled people view themselves and their lives. I’m very happy to break them down. Thank you so much for visiting and commenting, Zainab ❤ I always love hearing from you and reading your blog.

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  6. This one touched me in ways I hadn’t thought about. I think being a person with an invisible chronic illness ( cancer), I’m in a position to have a more understanding perspective. People don’t stare at me, but they don’t have a clear appreciation for what I experience as I fight this beast daily.

    Thanks for sharing this story of your bravery and heart-felt portrayal of what experience in this thing called life is like. God bless you. I will definitely reblog this and share it on the Chronic Illness Facebook page I host.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I’m so glad that this post touched you. I understand why it must be difficult when people don’t show you that appreciation for what you experience daily. Everyone deserves a chance to be understood, no matter what they’re going through. Thank you so much for these encouraging words and for the blessing. Also, I can’t thank you enough for helping to spread the word about it on your blog and Facebook page. Thanks very much for helping me to spread this important message ❤

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  7. What an awesome post, Simone! I love the photos you shared, especially on your stairlift. I actually saw a tweet from someone just recently who shared the joy that they felt when they got their first stairlift. And I think we need more of that, people sharing their joy instead of being taught to be ashamed of something apart of them.

    To answer your question, something that I need to work on so that I can be more proud of myself is my perception of my OCD. I am often ashamed of my mental illness, but I would love to see it as a strength of how far I’ve come in my mental health journey.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. It’s cool that you saw that tweet. You’re right, we definitely need more of that. I’m glad that you liked the photos! 🙂 I’m sorry to hear that you’re often ashamed of your OCD. I understand – other people aren’t always the most considerate or understanding when it comes to neurodiversity. Sometimes it can feel like working on being proud of different parts of ourselves isn’t as important as everything else we do in the day, but it’s essential to remember that you are important too. Every part of you deserves love – even the parts that you aren’t as proud of. We all deserve self-love and acceptance considering all the hard work we do. You’re right, your OCD is a strength that shows how far you’ve come in your mental health journey. Never forget to show yourself that love and respect when you think about it. ❤ ❤ ❤

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  8. GOOD FOR YOU!!! You are so brave to share your vulnerabilities here. You have my admiration in spades! Dealing with folks’ tendencies to judge anything different is always a challenge. I was born with a gigantic bright red birthmark on my nose, and I wasn’t allowed to hide it with makeup until age 16. You might imagine the years I endured being ridiculed & ostracized. But I truly believe it’s helped make me the deeply empathic person I am today. Blessings to you, my friend. 🌞

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    1. I’m sorry that you were ridiculed when you were younger because of your birthmark, people can be so close-minded and mean when it comes to anything that makes people different. I’m happy that you feel that it has made you a more empathic person though, it’s incredible that you used something which other people percieved as a weakness to help you to build another strength. That’s something that takes a lot of courage and resillience. I’m so happy that you think that I’m brave. This blog has certainly helped me to accept myself more ❤

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  9. I’m glad that you shared this post because I have recently been placed on a very restrictive diet because of my low kidney function. I went with family to a restaurant yesterday and the only thing on the menu I could have was an English muffin, so that is what I ordered. I got some strange looks, but life happens. So, roll with it, smile and trust God. On the good side, since I finished eating early, I could help feed our autistic granddaughter. She needs help because otherwise her attention wanders constantly and she just doesn’t eat. I’m happy you are not ashamed of your disability. God bless you for your courage.

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    1. I’m happy that this post spoke to you. I agree – life happens, roll with it. Those people may have given you strange looks when you ordered that muffin but I’m glad that you didn’t let it shake you. And there was even a good side to it because you were able to feed your granddaughter afterwards, trust God indeed, he always knows what he’s doing. Thank you, God bless you too. xxx

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  10. This is such an uplifting and inspiring post, well done! I definitely need to work on my hair more, to be honest. I struggle to maintain it but insist on keeping it long so that I can style it. However, most of the time I can’t work with it anyway because I keep knotting it up in a ponytail. My Mum has offered me help, but it comes down to that thing.of believing that I should be able to rake care of it myself. We’re a true conundrum sometimes!

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    1. Thank you 🙂 XD Yes, sometimes we are. I like your long hair, I’ve seen it in the pictures you’ve shared of yourself. I love it when my mother does my hair, it feels very therapeutic and relaxing – sort of like a massage. I also know that partners sometimes do each other’s hair in a romantic, relaxing atmosphere. Maybe in the Summer you’ll have more time to style it, or let others style it, if you want.

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  11. you should never feel shame.OTHERS SHOULD .very very well done for talking about Accidents .i am Disabled i have BOTH Bladder and Bowel problems .i am not afraid to say /not afraid to talk about it .i have BOTH M.E . AND FIBROMAGYIA long list health issues …my blog.http;//mark-kent.webs.com twitter.supersnopper …….. People are very SNOTTY NOSED with there views/judgements about Disability..MARK

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    1. I’m happy that you appreciated point number two about having accidents, and I’m glad that you aren’t afraid to talk about it either. It’s rare for other disabled people to read and comment on my posts so it’s great to hear from you. Yes, people can be very snotty-nosed with their judgements about disability which can be quite disheartening. They let their close-mindedness get in the way of understanding and accepting people like us.

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  12. Wow this is great and you know what asking for help from someone doesn’t make you any less from anyone…. asking for help is just normal human function, everyone does it …. you are doing great girl❤❤❤
    And you have to see me eating burger, the sauce,the vegetables are all over my clothes and my mouth😂😂😂
    Ps- you are rocking that purple and red hair

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    1. Aw, thanks so much! Purple was definitely one of my favourite colours to wear. XD Yeah, I guess burgers are sort of made to be messy. But they’re just so tasty I can’t stop eating them! I agree, asking for help is normal human function no matter who you are. No one can live life alone. Thanks so much for these kind words! ❤

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  13. Shame? How dare they? ****They**** should be ashamed! Those who place it upon you are way out of line – you’re already on the right track of understanding this – but in the off times whenever you succumb to their meanness by taking on the unfounded shame, don’t hesitate to vent with those who love and care about you and lean on them for ‘help’. Easier said than done – but I’m rooting for you.
    ps-I agree with vaniheart above…keep up ’em guessing on your purple or red or who-knows-what’s-next hair!

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    1. Thanks, Laura ❤ I'm trying to remind myself more to speak to others about the issue whenever I feel hurt. Sometimes it can be easy to bottle it all in and forget that there are people who are ready to listen to me when I need them. Thanks for the reminder though, it's always a relief to be able to 'vent' when I need to. XD I'm glad you liked the hair! Red was my personal favourite 🙂

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    1. Thank you ❤ I'm glad that you found it to be helpful. I'm happy too, it feels relieving to not have to put energy into hiding who I am. Embracing challenges and being proud of myself is an accomplishment I take great joy in, I hope that you were able to achieve the same since you are a wonderfully fun woman and a great writer – you deserve a lot of self-love too ❤

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      1. You’re soooo welcome! It was soooo awesome and gives others hope and inspiration!!! Good for you! We all have our challenges in one way or another and I have had my share of them for sure. I too am grateful for finding grace and acceptance. Thank you sooo much❣️❣️ ❤️🤗

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  14. “Accepting extra help doesn’t have to mean that you’re giving up – it can simply mean that you’ve picked your battles a little more wisely.”
    That’s, indeed, a wise thought. Thank you for another honest, eye-opening post. 💚

    Liked by 3 people

    1. You’re welcome! I’m glad that you liked it 🙂 That’s something that took me a long time to realise, I’m happy that in the end I was able to find the positive side to recieving help ❤

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  15. Your blog is a shout out to the society, as your perspective with all its nuances and how you feel when you are alone in the crowd is the voice of many..Keep going
    Surprise alert – it’s a saying that if you have a gap in your front upper teeth you’ll be super rich. Even I have that.
    So let’s see..Cheers!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m so happy that you see my blog this way! 🙂 I hope to be the voice of many and to stand up for the disabled community and people who don’t believe in themselves yet, I’m glad that you enjoyed it. I’ve never heard that saying, that’s really cool! It would be nice if it turned out to be true. We’re both a part of the gap toothed club. Cheers ❤

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  16. I enjoyed your post. What you said about the stairlift is so true… I tried thinking back, but still could not recall a young person on TV, or in a movie using one. Even when one was available, it would more often that not malfunction, or be used to kill someone for the inheritance etc. As for the other four… spot on! Again, a great read…
    🇯🇲🏖️

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you, I’m glad you enjoyed it! Yes, I’m very disappointed in modern media when it comes to how they’ve chosen to represent stairlifts. The place where I often see the most disabled representation is in horror films. It’s usually a case of: ‘this situation is horrible, but what could make it even scarier? If someone was disabled and not able to escape.’ A lot of things used to help disabled people like stairlifts and wheelchairs are used as traps in horror films.

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  17. You are a brave, beautiful soul and I applaud you for embracing your new appreciation for who you are! This is a very important insight that will be a value to many others. Thank you for sharing so much , and in such a beautifully written way.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thank you so much for your heart-felt comment ❤ I really do hope that this insight will be value to others – growing up, I wish that I had someone disabled that showed me that there was no shame in all of the things that make me who I am. Your encouraging words mean a lot, thank you for calling me brave and a beautiful soul ❤

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    1. Thank you for these kind words ❤ I feel honoured to be able to stand up for my community in this way. You’re definitely right – God made us all to be different and unique. We should celebrate those differences more, rather than letting them divide us.

      Like

  18. “Accepting extra help doesn’t have to mean that you’re giving up – it can simply mean that you’ve picked your battles a little more wisely.” what a beautiful statement. I definitely need to watch that documentary (: You are such an inspiration! You were amazing you are amazing and will continue to be amazing, in terms of content that sure was one of the best post I have read this week, and those colours look fantastic on you, I hope you will always keep smiling. Thank you so much for sharing❤

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Aw, what a huge compliment! It brings me so much joy that you truly enjoyed this post and its content. That statement was about something that took me a long while to learn, but now I’m very happy that I have. I’m glad you enjoyed my hair colours 😊 Thank you for these amazing encouraging words, they truly brought a smile to my face 💕

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Thanks for sharing yourself with such authenticity. The world needs more people with your positive outlook. I struggle at times with asking for help, I think many people do. Even able-bodied people sometimes need help in various situations. We must learn to see the courage and inner strength it takes to humbly ask for assistance. Blessings to you!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. You’re welcome! 😊 I agree, asking for help is something every human needs to do from time to time and it can sometimes be understandingly tough to do – no matter what situation you’re in. I hope that more people will find that courage that you mentioned to ask for assistance. Our weaknesses, our strengths, things we need help for, and things we do independently – all of these make us who we are. Blessings to you too 💕

      Liked by 1 person

  20. Reblogged this on The Searchlight and commented:
    I can’t help reblogging this piece to make possible for others to share in your thoughts and experiences. It’s great to know you have come over most of your experiences. More places to go for you. Keep on dear with your bright mind and intellect.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for reblogging this! I greatly appreciate your support. And thank you for these kind compliments, overcoming my experiences certainly wasn’t easy, it was a slow and gradual process, but I’m very happy and honoured to be sharing it with you all on this blog. Glad you enjoyed 💖

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sure I enjoyed it. I reblog and promote great thoughts of fellow bloggers and other writers for the good of humanity. Please keep exercising your thoughts. You live for yourself and your experiences are sure to propel others.

        Liked by 1 person

  21. What a beautiful, heartfelt post, Simone! You look gorgeous by the way…your smile is so infectious!!☺️☺️. I love your positivity and courage. Keep goin girl!!! Stay blessed always ❤️🤗🌻💐🌹

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Aw, thanks so much ❤ I’m glad that you like my smile, that makes me so happy!!! It means a lot that you like my positivity, because my posts used to be quite negative before I had accepted my disability, gradually they turned more positive now that I’ve accepted myself. I hope that you’ll stay blessed too 🌼🌷🌸💮

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  22. I love the Bible verse that says “I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well.” Psalm 139:14. Thank you for your honesty and bravery. And besides, “Normal is just a setting on the dryer” (Patsy Clarmont)! 🙃

    Liked by 2 people

    1. You’re welcome, I’m happy that you appreciated my honesty and bravery. And thanks for sharing this verse with me, you’re right, we may all be different but we’re still all fearfully and wonderfully made ❤

      Like

    1. I’m glad that you enjoyed this post 😊 Thank you so much for calling me talented, that really means a lot. I’m definitely trying to be myself more unapologetically now – it’s something that we should all try ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Hats off to you for your inner strength and determination! It’s such a good thing to see you live your life with such positivity: the world needs more people like you around ❤

    Btw, loved all the cool hair streaks: especially the blue and purple one!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you! That really means a lot ❤ I’m also glad that you enjoyed my hair, before the lockdown, I used to love getting it down in colours. Unfortunately, I haven’t been to the hairdressers in over a year. Hopefully they’ll open up again soon. Thank you so much for visiting and commenting! 😊

      Liked by 1 person

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